Old grapes

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Dafni is a vey old grape variety, its name being inscribed on Bronze Age vessels found on Crete. Its fortunes were revived by the maker of the wine we tried, namely Lyrarakis, in his 37 acres Psarades vineyard. This was the 2016 vintage. Descriptions tend to focus on the wine’s herbal aromas as well as bay and eucalyptus leaf smells.

Light lemon in colour with medium viscosity it certainly had an aromatic nose with a fresh lemon and peppery bouquet. The nose was certainly inviting but, unfortunately, the taste disappointed us. It was short, lacking in intensity with very high acidity. It started to cloy the palate and would have benefitted from some food accompaniment, though Richard said it did improve through the evening.

Much preferred was the Santorini wine made from the Aidani grape by Sigolas (2015). Kept in stainless steel for nine months, this wine had a Viognier-like, herbal and floral quality. Full-flavoured, the wine was quite nutty and would have really suited strong food.

Two more Mediterranean grape varieties: it’s certainly been interesting trying these more obscure grapes.

[Richard, we’ve blogged on Lyrakakis wines before – they specialise in resurrecting forgotten indigenous varieties on Crete. The dafni came from the duty-free at Chania airport, about 12€. More a curiosity than anything else which I didn’t see anywhere else for sale on the island. Despite the small production I see that both M&S and Berry Bros carry stock. Like Geoff I preferred the Aidani which had much more tropical fruit character. This was part of a mixed case of up-market Greek wine from the WS. No longer available, around £20, I’d guess.]

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