Never knowingly underhyped

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Mas de Daumas Gassac is east of Montpellier in the Haute Vallee du Gassac, Herault and achieved fame – or notoriety with local traditionalists – by using Cabernet Sauvignon, a grape more often associated with Bordeaux. Their informative and slick web site could not be accused of hiding its light under a wine bushel, proclaiming the 2005 vintage as having “finesse, it’s friendly and elegant, soft, fruity and mouth-wateringly rounded. Thoroughly enjoyable and seductive … and designed to wine you over with its affability … genuinely great …. truly outstanding!” Wow!

More prosaically, in colour it had a brick rim with an intense red core and medium viscosity. The nose was sweet cassis with tertiary notes of stewed fruits and pleasing acidity. So far, so good. The acidity came through nicely on the palate which was long and dry, with liquorice-like richness. After the nose, the palate was a tad disappointing.

Overall, although a well-made, pleasant wine we found it lacking a little character and any real sense of place. Richard gave the sobriquet ‘a lunchtime Languedoc’ which I though quite apposite (it’s 12.5% ABV).

[Richard: had this one a while – since 2008 (£24, WS), hence the rather tatty appearance. Certainly ready to drink and a wine which, as Geoff suggests, failed to deliver in the mouth what the (very appealing) nose promised. That is quite a common phenomenon when drinking claret, with which this wine is often compared (it’s 63% Cabernet Sauvignon,8% Cabernet Franc, 7% Merlot plus lots of other grapes, mostly not indigenous to the Languedoc either.]

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1 Comment

Filed under posted by Geoff

One response to “Never knowingly underhyped

  1. John

    Rich and Geoff, took my Dad to visit M de G D in about 2005. Apart from treading grapes and only using gravity to move grape juice their usp was the noble grapes planted on specially chosen land. The Reds weren’t special. Quite flat in fact.