Tag Archives: Loire

Low on alcohol – big on flavour

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We have tried a few wines recently which have been rather old-fashioned in that the alcohol levels were low – 12.5% – but there was an abundance of flavour. Not being a lover of wines high in alcohol they really appealed to me and Friday night’s selection was one of those. Melaric les Fontanelles 2014 hales from the Saumur and is pure Chenin Blanc. It had spent 12 months in barrel and a further 8 months bottled in a cellar. The result being an impressive wine.

Deep yellow with some viscosity, it had a spicy nose (ginger?), lemony with richness – R. thought beeswax polish. There was a clean minerality, and some fruit sweetness balanced by acidity. The finish was dry, persistent and gave the impression of power. This is a well-made wine from two growers committed to organic farming on chalk soils in an area more noted for sparkling wines which can be a bit anonymous. This certainly wasn’t. Available via Vin Cognito, it costs £27.95.

[Richard: rather more than I would normally pay for a Chenin Blanc – a grape I rarely drink – but the reviews (from the Jancis Robinson website) were spectacular and I hope it would make for an interesting tasting. A very powerful wine which was unchanged on day 2 and which shows that you don’t need lots of alcohol to give power and persistence on the palate.]

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2 x 12.5%

It’s not often we taste lowish alcohol wines (apart from champagne/sparkling wine which is always 12.5%), but this Sunday we tried two.

The first was another cabernet franc (Chinon Cornuelles Domaine Sourdais WS £20), and as last week, I was able to identify the actual bottle. Not difficult because the grape is distinctive in aroma and taste. Together with the appearance of the wine in the glass – clearly mature, slightly muddy – that suggested a wine we have blogged before and so it proved. A classy drink with loads of flavour and length. A shame the WS sold out so quickly although we have a couple of bottles left.

[Geoff: Those of you with excellent eyesight will have seen this is vintage 1996, showing that Cabernet Franc can be a long-liver. I’d had some the night before when it was almost sweet but certainly fragile. I then put it in the fridge (to slow down the ageing) and we tasted it slightly cool. This accentuated its green notes and gave it the ‘bite’ it lacked on first opening. An interesting difference over the two days. Full marks to R. – two tastings, two exact spots. Master of Wine standard, that.]

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3-4/9?

A nine point scale is used by the Wine Society, and possibly others, to rate sweetness in a wine, with 1 being the driest. Geoff had warned me that this wine might be too sweet for me and so it proved. Bright, darkish lemon in colour with a caramel nose. Good, rich mouth feel, off-dry to medium with a rather one-note taste and a clean, non-cloying, rather dry finish, I found myself repeating what I invariably say about wines of this type – ‘well made, but…’ Just too sweet for me (even though it wasn’t that sweet).

[Geoff: I bought this bottle on a recent ‘official’ visit to the Loire. This wasn’t lusciously Sauterne sweet and I decided to try it with some roast pork in sweetish, apple-rich gravy. I very much enjoyed it, finishing it with some Bleu d’Auvergne cheese later. My wife agreed with Richard, saying it was too sweet. I also think something slightly less sweet would have been an equally good match.]

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Rebonjour to Chenonceaux

This was our second tasting of a wine (La Long Bec, Domaine Echardières. Loire Valley 2014) from a comparatively new (2011) appellation – Chenonceaux. A rather mature, dense looking wine, with a smokey, dusty nose and a hint of mint. Dry with dark fruit and a longish finish. A  50/50 blend of Malbec and Cabernet Franc, with the second grape recognisable but not the first – we don’t drink much Malbec. Clearly well made and very drinkable.

[Geoff: I had tried another bottle of this red wine only a week previously and it really impressed me. There is a good blend of the very slight farmyard aromas of an ageing CF together with its trademark raspberry nose. the Malbec (Cot in the Loire) gives firmer, fuller body to the blend. This makes the taste a balanced blend of firmness, body and fruit. It is available from Vin Neuf at Stratford.]

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Beer or wine?

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I’d seen this in Waitrose and, to be frank, thought what an unfortunate handle. It reminded me more of a low-alcohol beer rather than a wine, but maybe that’s just me. Anyway, Richard presented the last of the bottle on Sunday and  …… I was rather impressed.

It hails from the Loire, Anjou, and, more precisely the Coteaux de Layon, an area more associated with sweeter wines from the later-harvested Chenin. The grape is the same but picked earlier, maintaining acidity and with the sugars fermented out. I like Chenin in its multiplicity of forms and enjoyed this also.

Made by Domaine Cady from the 2015 vintage, it is organic and costs £16 (£12 on offer) from Waitrose. The colour is deep lemon with some viscosity (the Chenin does develop sugars easily) whilst the nose repeats the lemon acidity with the addition of a chalky note, also reminiscent of the classic Chenin ‘wet wool’. The palate was complex – almonds, acidity, richness with bags of character and the ability to develop in the bottle.

Getting a thumbs up from me, this wine would be great with veal, chicken, river fish or a quality cheese.

[Richard: no thumbs up from me, more a shrug. Too sweet and I didn’t find it as complex as Geoff did. Worth a punt but I wouldn’t buy it again, even on offer which this was.]

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Moulin Touchais 1983 (with cheese)

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One family have managed and owned this vineyard since two years before the French Revolution which, considering the French laws of inheritance, is a feat in itself. Situated in the heart of the Coteaux du Layon, south of the Loire below Angers, this is a wine well-known for its sweetness and, surprisingly Richard liked it!

The Chenin Blanc grapes are harvested early (20%) for acidity, the balance being picked when the grapes have developed sweetness and it this superb balance of the sugars and acids which makes the wine so attractive. The wine is kept – in bottle – for 10 years before release thereby maintaining freshness as it slowly matures over the long period. The result – a beautifully balanced  wine of 14% ABV which is a delight to drink.

Colour? Think Lucozade, deep orange, but bright as a button and with minimal viscosity.

Aromas? Slightly oxidised, slightly toffee, not particularly complex.

Taste? Sweet honey, long, acidity for freshness, light weight and relatively simple, beautifully made.

Absolutely superb with the salty andsweet Dolcellate which brings out its richness. Not so good with salty Roquefort as it makes the cheese appear acidic.

Great experience. A dessert island wine.

[Richard: from the WS, £30, not unreasonable for a 34 year old wine. Sold out unfortunately. Can’t add to Geoff’s comments except to emphasise that the wine really comes to life with a blue cheese. There is still plenty left so I’ll try with another variety next time.]

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A new appellation…

Namely Touraine Chenonceaux. Actually created in 2011 but in French wine bureaucracy terms that is as yesterday. The link has lots of useful information if, like me, you had never previously heard of this area or tasted their wine.

Speaking of which: a French style sauvignon blanc, that is to say lacking the sharp, sometimes piercing nose of a New World equivalent. Quite shy in fact with some melon or similar – a rather ‘sweet’ nose which led you to expect an off-dry taste. In fact, on the palate and wine was rich, slightly raw with some good acidity and length. Not tasted blind which was just as well as I’m not sure I would have picked the grape. Geoff found it not to his taste so I took the bottle home where Angie liked it a lot.

The wine: Domaine des Caillots 2014 ‘pur sauvignon blanc’.

[Geoff: The hospitality of three French vineyard owners (husband and wife teams) in Chenonceaux  was infectious. All essentially rivals, but also keen to promote their new AC, they provided a tasting of a selection of their wines and then gave us two bottles each to take away! They’d have liked us to stay longer but we had a tunnel time to meet. We did feel guilty about not doing them justice – only 90 minutes for 9 wines.

I’m glad Angie liked it. For me it had the hallmarks of Sauvignon – albeit much muted – namely acidity, lack of richness and breadth with little complexity. However, I did appreciate its difference to the vast majority of Touraine wines which can be rather anonymous. A Chenonceaux white is stocked by Majestic.

We’ll try a Chenonceaux red soon which is the AC’s standard blend of Cabernet Franc and Cot (Malbec). I enjoyed these more than the whites.

I wish the new region well.

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